Cornous Biology, Volume 1, Issue 1 : 26-34. Doi : 10.37446/corbio/rsa/1.1.2023.26-34
Research Article

Published on : 30-Jun-2023

Assessment of heavy metal concentration and their relationship in beef sold in markets

  • Raymond Lovelace Adjei
  • Animal Health Division, CSIR-Animal Research Institute, Katamanso, Accra, Ghana.
  • Theresah Nkrumah
  • New Products and Innovation Division, CSIR-Animal Research Institute, Katamanso, Accra, Ghana.
  • Maxwell Ansong Okai
  • Farmed Animal Technology Development Division, CSIR-Animal Research Institute, Katamanso, Accra, Ghana.
  • Francis Kruenti
  • Farmed Animal Technology Development Division, CSIR-Animal Research Institute, Katamanso, Accra, Ghana.
  • Ethel Blessie
  • Food Microbiology and Mushroom, Research Division, CSIR-Food Research Institute, Accra, Ghana.

Abstract

This study was conducted to assess the concentration and relationship of lead, cadmium, and arsenic in the fresh muscle, kidney, and liver of cattle. Thirty samples of each of the meat parts were obtained from the Ashaiman Main, Madina, and Makola Markets within the Accra Metropolis. A GTA Graphite Tube Atomizer was used to analyze the heavy metal concentrations. Arsenic was significantly different in the liver (2.40 mg/100g), kidney (0.93 mg/100g), and muscle (0.35 mg/100g). Lead was significantly higher in the liver (1.14 mg/100g) but insignificant between the kidney (0.67 mg/100g) and muscle (0.66 mg/100g). Arsenic was significantly higher in beef from the Ashaiman Main Market (2.48 mg/100g) than in samples from Madina (0.85 mg/100g) and Makola (0.35 mg/100g) Markets. The concentration of cadmium varied across the meat parts and the three markets. The correlation between the metals in all the meat tissues was positively low to high, but the arsenic-cadmium association was negatively low (r = -0.08). Heavy metals were present in all the meat samples from the three markets, but their concentration depended on the meat parts. Generally, higher concentrations of the metals were recorded in beef from the Ashaiman compared to Madina and Makola Markets. The liver had a comparatively lower heavy metal concentration and was therefore recommended for consumption.

Keywords

heavy metals, concentration, correlation, beef, markets

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