Journal of Innovative Agriculture, Volume 10, Issue 3 : 1-13. Doi : 10.37446/jinagri/ra/10.3.2023.1-13
Review Article

Published on : 30-Sep-2023

Jatropha curcas L.: A sustainable resource for biofuel feedstock with medicinal and commercial attributes

  • Namrata Jaspal
  • Department of Plant Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Central University of Himachal Pradesh, Shahpur Campus – 176206, Kangra (HP), India.
  • Munish Sharma
  • Department of Plant Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Central University of Himachal Pradesh, Shahpur Campus – 176206, Kangra (HP), India.
  • Deepika B. Prashar
  • Department of Plant Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Central University of Himachal Pradesh, Shahpur Campus – 176206, Kangra (HP), India.
  • Rahul Sharma
  • Senior Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Government Post Graduate College for Women Gandhi Nagar-180003, Jammu-J&K UT, India.
  • Munish Sharma
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Plant Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Central University of Himachal Pradesh, Shahpur Campus – 176206, Kangra (HP), India.

Abstract

The Euphorbiaceae family includes Jatropha curcas L., a tree with the greatest potential for producing biofuel. A perennial, drought-resistant, and extremely adaptable plant, it is gaining prominence in the biodiesel industry. Ratanjyot, Nutmeg plant, Barbados nut, and Physic nut are some of its more well-known names. Jatropha trees grow 3 to 6 meters tall, with heart-shaped green leaves, smooth, grey bark, and latex. A huge shrub or small tree known as Jatropha curcas L. produces seeds containing inedible oil. Jatropha curcas, a tropical plant, can be cultivated as a commercial crop or on farms in areas with varying precipitation levels, ranging from low to high. Plants can be grown as a crop or as a border hedge to keep grazing animals away from crops and minimize soil erosion. Jatropha leaves, seeds, and bark have been used medicinally since ancient times, treating constipation, anthelmintic difficulties, and stomach illnesses. Many different secondary metabolites were discovered when physio-chemists studied the extracts and latex, such as alkaloids, saponins, curcin, curcusones-B, curcain, lectin, curcacycline A, phorbol acetate, tannins, steroids, etc. The J. curcas plant is used in various ways, including replacing fossil fuel diesel for domestic purposes, soap production, and raw materials for dye. Due to their Antiviral, Anticancer, Antidiarrheal, larvicidal and insecticidal activities are currently receiving a lot of interest. It is a versatile tree species suitable for agroforestry and other afforestation programs. Exploration has been conducted into plant potential utilization for diverse purposes.

Keywords

Jatropha curcas, ratanjyot, phytochemicals, biodiesel, oil

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