Research Biotica, Volume 2, Issue 1 : 15-19. Doi : 10.54083/ResBio.2.1.2020.15-19
Research Article

Published on : 22-Mar-2020

Fertility Assessment of Soil and Suitable Amelioration for Sustainable Quality Mulberry Leaf and Cocoon Production in Karnataka

  • P. Sudhakar
  • Regional Sericultural Research Station, Central Silk Board (CSB), Ananthapur-515 001, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • V. Sobhana
  • Central Sericultural Research and Training Institute, Central Silk Board, Mysuru-570 008, Karnataka, India
  • M.R. Swamy Gowda
  • Regional Sericultural Research Station, Central Silk Board, Kodathi, Bangaluru-560 035, Karnataka, India
  • Sibayan Sen
  • Central Sericultural Research and Training Institute, Central Silk Board, Mysuru-570 008, Karnataka, India
  • M.V. Sneha
  • Central Sericultural Research and Training Institute, Central Silk Board, Mysuru-570 008, Karnataka, India
  • V. Sivaprasad
  • Central Sericultural Research and Training Institute, Central Silk Board, Mysuru-570 008, Karnataka, India

Abstract

The composite soil samples received from the various cluster sericulture farmer mulberry gardens (2067) of Karnataka state were subjected for their physical and chemical analysis for measuring their nutrient status. It was noticed that 52% soils characterised as clay loamy, 28% red loamy, 12% black cotton and only 8% soils were red lateritic in nature. Soil pH was recorded in the range of 6.10-7.96 with 7.03 average pH. Among them 59% soils comprised with desired pH (6.5 to 7.5%), 21% with high pH (>7.5) and 20% recorded with low pH (<6.5). Soluble salt content (EC) of the mulberry soils ranged from 0.11 to 0.90 with a mean value of 0.69 dS/m. All most all the soils of the state (99%) recorded with desired levels of EC (<1.0 dS/m2) indicating ideal for mulberry. Organic Carbon (OC) was ranged from 0.12-1.06 with a mean value of 0.64%. Out of the soils 74% recorded with low OC (<0.65%) followed by 24% desired (0.65-1.0%) and 2% in rich OC (>1.0%) indicating that soils received were deficient in OC. The macronutrients (N, P & K) presence and distribution revealed that, available Nitrogen (N) registered in 116.4-349.8 with 212.3kg/ha average content. Similarly 76% soils registered with low level of available nitrogen (<250kg/ha), 23% in medium (250-500kg/ha) whereas 1% with high N (>500kg/ha). Phosphorous (P) in the range of 3.69-103.9 with an average value of 30.1kg/ha. However the distribution of available P is in the ratio of 36:34:30 of high (P>25kg/ha), low (P<15kg/ha) and desired levels of P (15-25kg/ha), respectively. Potassium (K) content was ranged in 181.7-905.4 with a mean value of 521.7kg/ha. The K distribution was high (>240kg/ha) in 42% soils followed by 40% in desired level (120-240kg/ha) and 18% soils recorded with lower quantities of available K (<120kg/ha). The micronutrients such as available Sulphur (S) and Boron (B) present in the range of 10.50-117.30 and 0.08-2.87 with a mean value of 63.90 & 1.48 ppm/ha, respectively. Sulphur distribution was noticed that 71% soils registered rich in S (>15ppm), 21% medium (10-15ppm/ha) and 15% soils represent deprived levels of S (<10ppm). Boron was found medium level (0.5-1.0ppm/ha) in 48% soils followed by 30% with low level B (<0.5ppm/ha) and 22% soils with high amount of B (>1.0ppm/ha). Based on the above findings suitable soil amelioration prescriptions were served in the form of ‘Soil Health Cards’ for correcting their mulberry gardens to minimise the cost of production thereby achieving quality mulberry leaf production for the development of Bivoltine sericulture.

Keywords

Mulberry, Leaf production, Soil analysis, Soil fertility, Organic carbon

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